Healthy Food That Reduces Your Carbon Footprint…

Aug 14, 2019

Most of us know there are benefits to going organic and going “green.” Although both are beneficial in the pursuit of Active Wellness and for planet Earth, there are differences. Going organic is health-centered while going green requires sustainable practices that impact economic, social and ecological factors that help protect Earth and its resources. In other words, sustainable food is virtually always organic, but not all organic food is sustainable.

Choosing sustainable food helps reduce an individual’s carbon footprint, which is the “amount of greenhouse gases produced to directly and indirectly support human activities, usually expressed in equivalent tons of carbon dioxide.”The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations claims that by switching to organic agriculture farmers can reduce up to 66% of carbon dioxide emissions.Large agricultural companies argue that some organically grown produce have a higher overall energy consumption and land use. This discrepancy presents the most obvious difference between simply organic, and actually sustainable, food.

The less processed the food is, the more sustainable it is. When you eat a raw organically grown vegetable or fruit, you are eliminating the carbon footprint of the power used in cooking by gas or electricity. Also, some vegetables have a carbon footprint nearly as serious as meat, because they are grown in green houses that use a lot of heat and light.

Here are some steps you can take to reduce your carbon footprint with what you eat:

1. Eat locally produced organic food.

2. Reduce your consumption of non-grass fed red meat and dairy. This is not only environmentally friendly but also heart friendly.

3. Research which fruits and vegetables are most carbon-friendly. For example, lentils require very little water to grow. They actually clean and fortify the soil, making it easier to grow other crops. Beans in general (including kidney, black, pinto, etc.) have a low carbon and water footprint. These legumes also have high nutritional values because of their protein and fiber content. Rice, on the other hand, is water intensive.

4. Mussels are harvested on long collector ropes suspended in oceans, and while growing, they eat naturally occurring food in the water. In the process, they filter and clean the water, even extracting carbon to make their shells. They have very little environmental impact.3

5. Buy fish in season from local farmer’s markets or fisheries that practice sustainable fishing.

6. Buy food in bulk when possible. The less packaging, the more sustainable the food. Use your own recyclable and reusable containers.

7. Eat what you buy. Reduce food waste by freezing excess and repurposing leftovers. Teach your children early in their lives to develop eating habits that are not only healthy but also helpful to planet Earth.

1. https://timeforchange.org/what-is-a-carbon-footprint-definition
2. https://www.terrapass.com/eat-your-way-to-a-smaller-carbon-footprint
3. https://www.globalcitizen.org/en/content/environment-food-cooking-sustainability/

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